Pizza Hut’s ‘Skinny Slice’ a Reflection of Struggle in the Fast Food Industry

Pizza Hut joins the long list of fast food chains attempting to come up with new products to meet the demands of health conscious customers. The attempt comes after the company’s sales fell by 2 percent at US locations last year. The company is currently testing “skinny slices” in two US cities, catering to those who want to limit the calories, without missing out on their favorite foods. Customers in Toledoa, Ohio, are able to create their own pizza made of the skinny slices with up to 5 toppings. Each slice is under 300 calories. Those in West Palm Beach, FL, can select up to 6 toppings, with slices being under 250 calories each. The “skinny” slices are thanks to the use of less dough and fewer toppings. When compared to the traditional, a non-skinny slice can range from 180 to 470 calories.

The innovation is a clear attempt to improve the image of fast food, yet historically such attempts have proved unsuccessful. Burger King’s “Satisfries,” the lower calorie French fry, were recently discontinued in August after a year due to disinterest among customers. Dominos’ whole wheat crust pizza met a similar fate.

It did not take us very long to learn that people did not want that from Domino’s,” said Chris Brandon, a Domino’s spokesman.

Caught between a rock and a hard place, fast food companies are struggling to cope with the move towards more nutritious meals without compromising the products customers are initially attracted to.

 

Read more here- “Pizza Hut Testing Lower-Calorie ‘Skinny Slice’,” (The Associated Press, NY Daily News)

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Olivia is a graduate of Villanova University where she studied Economics and History, minoring in Gender and Women's Studies. She also has experience working with federal legislatures on health care policy, women's issues, and Internet safety.

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